Frieze 2015 NYC: A Look Back

Daniel-Arsham

See this published on Flavorpill

As Frieze crashed through New York like an art-filled tidal wave, we can finally reflect on the fair’s deliriously infinite offerings. With a cultural hubris and will to power through all the fair had to offer, I sailed off to Randall’s Island,  and along with my cultural comrades, I spent the sun-soaked weekend amidst the art world elite. Four days of perusing over 190 galleries, experiencing the many non-profit programs including Frieze Projects, Talks, Sounds and Education, in addition to the satellite exhibitions like Nada Art Fair and Art in FLUX on Manhattan, this past weekend was one of artistic endurance to say the least.

With the eye-opening amount of art on view, Frieze, naturally, became a hotbed for social media. Let’s face it, hashtagging #FriezeNY along with a selfie in front of a Richard Prince New Portraits, from his notorious Instagram series,  packs a cultural cred your Middle America followers will undoubtedly applaud. With this Digital Enlightenment characterized by internet fads and 20 minute trends, the next big thing is the ominous presence on everyone’s cultural horizon. Amidst the many mediums represented at Frieze, a few trends truly spoke to this day and age’s digital addictions.

Read More

Advertisements

8 Standouts From The Architectural Digest Home Design Show

Eric Trine

Eric Trine

A premier source for architects, designers, and like-minded trendsetters, the 14th annual Architectural Digest Home Design Show was the place to discover the ‘next big thing’ in furniture design. After pursuing the thousands of products from over 400 brands on view, the 2015 furniture forecast championed the handmade statement piece that will bring the room together and add a touch of individual charm to an existing sea of Ikea sets.

Handcrafted, local, and one-of-a-kind were buzzwords for every vendor located in the MADE section of the show, which celebrated independent designers and fine art objects. The material trending these up-and-coming boutiques is a classic revival of wood with a contemporary twist. Check out this list of 8 designers creating furniture that is both functional and fun.

Read More

REVIEW: Zhang Huan’s Stunning, Ambitious “Semele” at BAM

Photo Credit: Jack Vartoogian/Frontrowphotos

Photo Credit: Jack Vartoogian/Frontrowphotos

See this review published on Flavorpill

Baroque opera meets Buddhism in the Canadian Opera Company’s U.S. premier of “Semele” at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. In the hands of director Zhang Huan—a Chinese performance artist based in Shanghai—George Handel’s 18th century oratorio takes a turn away from tradition as Chinese and Japanese cultures intervene with the Greek tragedy.

“Semele” is Huan’s directorial debut and first foray into theatrical set design. In his notes on “Semele” Huan stated, “My goal is to allow the opera singers to reenact this classical Western opera on an Eastern stage latent with the tragic emotions of Semele—while at the same time allowing the audience to experience the dramatic beauty and pain common to all human beings.”

Read More

Un-Natural Nature exhibition featured in Issues in Science and Technology

Un-Natural Nature

The art exhibition I curated for the SciArt Center, Un-Natural Nature, is featured in the magazine Issues in Science and Technology. The feature starts on page 80 of the PDF below. Issues is normally a hard copy magazine, you may be able to order them through their website as well.

Visit the virtual exhibition Un-Natural Nature on the SciArt Center website.

View the PDF of Issues Winter 2015_2.

 

Death Becomes Her: A Century of Mourning Attire at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Death-Becomes-Her-

See this published on Flavorpill

Mourning practices during the 19th century were more than a private grievance, they were a public ritual upholding status through fashionable style. Curated by the Costume Institute, Death Becomes Her: A Century of Mourning Attire examines the aesthetic convergence of customary black mourning attire with the stylish trends of the day.

The burden of mourning fell mostly on women as men were expected to upkeep economic responsibilities. As a result the majority of the 30 looks on view are examples of upper to middle class women’s wear. Exhibited chronologically on a central stage in the Anna Wintour Costume Center, bright spotlights highlight the multiple layers of textured fabrics used to skillfully craft a dutiful yet fashionable ensemble. Projected onto the surrounding walls are anecdotes from diary entries, fashion magazines, and other historical documents contextualizing the ensembles with personal narratives.

Read More

Richard Prince: Old selfies are “New Paintings” at Gagosian Gallery

One of my favorite selfies I took at the Jeff Koons show at the Whitney

One of my favorite selfies I took at the Jeff Koons show at the Whitney

Read this review on Metro New York

Download the PDF of this Metro review here

Appropriation artist Richard Prince is back at his controversial antics again with a series of “New Paintings.” Well, they’re “paintings” in that they’re ink-jet prints, and they’re “new” in that these are Instagram photos taken by other people. If the sheer absurdity of seeing the best selfies of everyone’s favorite social-media app in an art gallery is not enough, here are three other reason you cannot miss “New Paintings.”

For the rousing debate of Contemporary Art

These paintings are not strictly a product of Prince’s artistic genius. The “New Paintings” are not even painted by the artist himself, but are inkjet prints created from Instagram screenshots. Is this art or is this copyright infringement? Prince is not new to legal controversy — he was sued in 2013 by photographer Patrick Cariou, who claimed Prince unrightfully appropriated his art. Prince came out of court victorious, which only added to his work’s caustic mystique.

Read More

Digital Collages Of Justin Davies

"Fox and Internevean Vole," digital collage, 21 x 21 inches, 2013

“Fox and Internevean Vole,” digital collage, 21 x 21 inches, 2013

See this review published in SciArt in America

My senses always appealed to collage since I first studied Dada Art. Dada collage by Hannah Hoch and John Heartfield submersed a political foundation underneath its satirical facade. Davies continues the agency of Collage in his digital work which comments on 21st century urban sprawl. As Davies states, “I use collage to explore the idea of evolutionary dislocation that occurs when a species is abruptly ousted from its evolutionary context.” His artwork is very attune to what Un-Natural Nature is meant to explore: how our ever-changing world affects the living organisms that call it home. Combining a technological medium with organic subject matter, Davies imprints an image of a 21st century ecosystem to show how nature continually adapts to the man-made.

Read on for an interview with the artist that expounds on his scientific inspirations, what he thinks is so “Un-Natural” about nature today, and what “SciArt” means in regards to his work.

Read More

Photographic Intrigue of Susi Brister

SusiBrister_Flora

“Flora,” archival pigment print, 44 x 44 inches, 2014

See this article published on SciArt in America

This article is part of the exhibition “Un-Natural Nature” curated by Danielle Kalamaras

Photographer Susi Brister recreates fantastical worlds usually kept secret in the realms of dreams. Her landscapes are filled with luscious fauna and through dramatic lighting and color enhancement, the everyday world becomes a sublime yet stoic scene. Taking center stage of these scenic worlds are aberrant figures draped with decorative fabrics and fully covered to the viewer as to not give a hint to the living organism beneath the dress. She dresses models in patterned textiles and fabrics to echo the natural world around them. As these playful figures mimic the world they are planted into, the photograph becomes a surreal montage that blurs the the line between the reality of the landscape and the fantasy of the rogue figure.

Read on for an artist statement by written by Susi Brister.

Read More

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec exhibition at MoMA

Toulouse-Lautrec-MoMA

See this review published on Metro New York

The artwork of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901), who seized the exuberant fin de siecle atmosphere of the Belle Epoque Paris, is currently on view in “The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters” at The Museum of Modern Art. The exhibition — featuring over 100 examples of Toulouse-Lautrec’s avant-garde works — is drawn almost exclusively from MoMA’s permanent collection of posters, lithographs, printed ephemera and illustrated books.

Toulouse-Lautrec documents the cult of the celebrity and the rise of popular entertainment in his prints, posters and lithographs for magazines and journals. The exhibition is organized into five subjects: Parisian nightlife, celebrities, artists of the avant-garde, prostitutes and the daily pleasures of the upper class. The famous Moulin Rouge takes center stage in the section devoted to the rise of nightlife culture in France. Cafe concerts and dance halls come alive in Toulouse-Lautrec’s distinct style characterized by vibrant color and swift brushstrokes. His energetic approach arrests the star power of the famous actresses, singers, dancers and performers filling these venues — including dancer Loie Fuller and stage actress Jane Avril.

Read More

Between Poetry and Politics: Christoph Schlingensief at MoMA PS1

Christoph_MoMA_PS1

German artist Christoph Schlingensief is a reactionary performance/video/installation artist with mature content/explicit images/and overall radical artwork. His current retrospective at MoMA PS1 which runs through September 7th is a valiant attempt to capture an artist’s ouevre not mean to be caught. Born in 1960 he worked until his death in 2010 on experimental and feature film, theater, opera, performance, installation, literature, TV shows, radio plays. He directed plays by William Shakespeare and operas by Richard Wagner, and was profoundly influenced by Joseph Beuys, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, and the Viennese Actionists.

His career is speckled with documentary vocational voyages around the world preaching the gospel of human rights and political indecency to the humanism of today. He continually engaged the audience in his art—in “The Stairlift to Heaven” (2007) (above) viewers are invited to ride a chairlift to a small video projection on view, all while becoming the star on stage as Schlingensief’s film is also projected onto the ascending trail. His career unearths the politics of the post-war German landscape—a mixture of an unknown future full of liberal unrest and its historical lineage that perpetually creeps its weary head into the present age.

Read more about his art, and his retrospective, on MoMA PS1.org