REVIEW: “Distinguishable From Magic” The New Virtual Exhibition From The SciArt Center

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See this published on SciArt in America February 9, 2016

Similarly to SciArt in America, their sister organization–SciArt Center—aims to provide support and promote cross-disciplinary approaches and interactions between the arts and sciences. SciArt Center is membership based and is both an online platform and a pop-up events organization (events are open to the public). With over 200 members worldwide, Virtual Exhibitions are a keystone of the organization’s promotion of its members cross disciplinary work. Virtual Exhibitions include Un-Natural Nature, The New Unconscious, and now Distinguishable From Magic—SciArt Center’s newest exhibition.

Curated by SciArt Center Curator Marnie Benney, Distinguishable From Magic features 12 member’s work including Amber Anderson, Linda Behar, Jared Vaughan Davis, Greg Dunn, Cedric Van Eenoo, Anna Fine Foer, Richelle Gribble, Constance Halporn, Alinta Krauth, Robert Krawczyk, Sam Talbot-Kelly, and Leila Christine Nadir.

The title is inspired by British science-fiction author Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008), most notably famous for co-writing the screenplay for Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey. His science fiction works often included chapters about aspects of science and technology aside from fantastical space travel such as computers, telecommunication satellites, and bioengineering.

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Frieze 2015 NYC: A Look Back

Daniel-Arsham

See this published on Flavorpill

As Frieze crashed through New York like an art-filled tidal wave, we can finally reflect on the fair’s deliriously infinite offerings. With a cultural hubris and will to power through all the fair had to offer, I sailed off to Randall’s Island,  and along with my cultural comrades, I spent the sun-soaked weekend amidst the art world elite. Four days of perusing over 190 galleries, experiencing the many non-profit programs including Frieze Projects, Talks, Sounds and Education, in addition to the satellite exhibitions like Nada Art Fair and Art in FLUX on Manhattan, this past weekend was one of artistic endurance to say the least.

With the eye-opening amount of art on view, Frieze, naturally, became a hotbed for social media. Let’s face it, hashtagging #FriezeNY along with a selfie in front of a Richard Prince New Portraits, from his notorious Instagram series,  packs a cultural cred your Middle America followers will undoubtedly applaud. With this Digital Enlightenment characterized by internet fads and 20 minute trends, the next big thing is the ominous presence on everyone’s cultural horizon. Amidst the many mediums represented at Frieze, a few trends truly spoke to this day and age’s digital addictions.

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Digital Collages Of Justin Davies

"Fox and Internevean Vole," digital collage, 21 x 21 inches, 2013

“Fox and Internevean Vole,” digital collage, 21 x 21 inches, 2013

See this review published in SciArt in America

My senses always appealed to collage since I first studied Dada Art. Dada collage by Hannah Hoch and John Heartfield submersed a political foundation underneath its satirical facade. Davies continues the agency of Collage in his digital work which comments on 21st century urban sprawl. As Davies states, “I use collage to explore the idea of evolutionary dislocation that occurs when a species is abruptly ousted from its evolutionary context.” His artwork is very attune to what Un-Natural Nature is meant to explore: how our ever-changing world affects the living organisms that call it home. Combining a technological medium with organic subject matter, Davies imprints an image of a 21st century ecosystem to show how nature continually adapts to the man-made.

Read on for an interview with the artist that expounds on his scientific inspirations, what he thinks is so “Un-Natural” about nature today, and what “SciArt” means in regards to his work.

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Photographic Intrigue of Susi Brister

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“Flora,” archival pigment print, 44 x 44 inches, 2014

See this article published on SciArt in America

This article is part of the exhibition “Un-Natural Nature” curated by Danielle Kalamaras

Photographer Susi Brister recreates fantastical worlds usually kept secret in the realms of dreams. Her landscapes are filled with luscious fauna and through dramatic lighting and color enhancement, the everyday world becomes a sublime yet stoic scene. Taking center stage of these scenic worlds are aberrant figures draped with decorative fabrics and fully covered to the viewer as to not give a hint to the living organism beneath the dress. She dresses models in patterned textiles and fabrics to echo the natural world around them. As these playful figures mimic the world they are planted into, the photograph becomes a surreal montage that blurs the the line between the reality of the landscape and the fantasy of the rogue figure.

Read on for an artist statement by written by Susi Brister.

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Top 3 Cool Art Shows In Chelsea

See this review on Metro New York

The Chelsea Art Season is in full swing as unconventional materials take center stage. From repurposed junk to iPad drawings, ditch the usual painting show for 3 art exhibitions a bit more out of the ordinary.

David_Hockney_Arrival Of Spring

‘David Hockney: The Arrival of Spring’

Veteran artist David Hockney depicts the gradual changes between seasons in his home county of East Yorkshire. His personal affiliation to the landscapes — and his use of technology — uplift a trying art show about nature into an engaging experience. “The Arrival of Spring” at Pace Gallery is a tech-driven exhibition of iPad drawings and video installations. Monumental prints drawn from his iPad of quiet U.K. landscapes exemplify the artist’s signature gestural style and soft palette. The culmination of this exhibition is Hockney’s 9-frame video installation exhibited across a multi-screen 3×3 grid. Filmed with nine cameras attached to a moving SUV, frames comes together to create a visual journey of a changing landscape.

If you go:
Through Nov. 1
Pace Gallery, 508 W. 25th St.
Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Free to the public
212-989-4258; www.pacegallery.com

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Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec exhibition at MoMA

Toulouse-Lautrec-MoMA

See this review published on Metro New York

The artwork of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901), who seized the exuberant fin de siecle atmosphere of the Belle Epoque Paris, is currently on view in “The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters” at The Museum of Modern Art. The exhibition — featuring over 100 examples of Toulouse-Lautrec’s avant-garde works — is drawn almost exclusively from MoMA’s permanent collection of posters, lithographs, printed ephemera and illustrated books.

Toulouse-Lautrec documents the cult of the celebrity and the rise of popular entertainment in his prints, posters and lithographs for magazines and journals. The exhibition is organized into five subjects: Parisian nightlife, celebrities, artists of the avant-garde, prostitutes and the daily pleasures of the upper class. The famous Moulin Rouge takes center stage in the section devoted to the rise of nightlife culture in France. Cafe concerts and dance halls come alive in Toulouse-Lautrec’s distinct style characterized by vibrant color and swift brushstrokes. His energetic approach arrests the star power of the famous actresses, singers, dancers and performers filling these venues — including dancer Loie Fuller and stage actress Jane Avril.

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Between Poetry and Politics: Christoph Schlingensief at MoMA PS1

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German artist Christoph Schlingensief is a reactionary performance/video/installation artist with mature content/explicit images/and overall radical artwork. His current retrospective at MoMA PS1 which runs through September 7th is a valiant attempt to capture an artist’s ouevre not mean to be caught. Born in 1960 he worked until his death in 2010 on experimental and feature film, theater, opera, performance, installation, literature, TV shows, radio plays. He directed plays by William Shakespeare and operas by Richard Wagner, and was profoundly influenced by Joseph Beuys, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, and the Viennese Actionists.

His career is speckled with documentary vocational voyages around the world preaching the gospel of human rights and political indecency to the humanism of today. He continually engaged the audience in his art—in “The Stairlift to Heaven” (2007) (above) viewers are invited to ride a chairlift to a small video projection on view, all while becoming the star on stage as Schlingensief’s film is also projected onto the ascending trail. His career unearths the politics of the post-war German landscape—a mixture of an unknown future full of liberal unrest and its historical lineage that perpetually creeps its weary head into the present age.

Read more about his art, and his retrospective, on MoMA PS1.org

An Autobiography of Love: James Lee Byars at MoMA PS1

“The Chair for the Philosophy of Question” (1990), with an antique Tibetan chair, in “James Lee Byars: ½ an Autobiography,” at MoMA PS!

“The Chair for the Philosophy of Question” (1990), with an antique Tibetan chair, in “James Lee Byars: ½ an Autobiography,” at MoMA PS1

See this review published on Bushwick Daily

As the story goes, there are a million different ways to say I Love You. For 20th Century conceptual-performance artist James Lee Byars, it was never about saying the words. “James Lee Byars: 1/2 an Autobiography” at MoMA PS1 chronicles this artist’s lifelong career as an artist who transformed his life into an artful series of eventful acts. He played the role of artist-as-shaman throughout his life as he sought to expound on philosophical concepts of perfection, truth, beauty, and love. He intertwined his art into his life and at moments the difference is immutable—which is exactly the point. As Byars dressed daily in monochrome suits of black, white, pink or gold, the world was his stage as he theatrically transformed the mundane into the extraordinary through his visual and performance art.

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Where Art meets Fashion: “Charles James: Beyond Fashion” at the Met

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All photos by the author, check out @danileekay on instagram for more artful photos

Read this review online at Metro.us or in print in Metro New York

If you haven’t been to the Met to catch “Charles James: Beyond Fashion,” it’s time to go. The exhibit closes Aug. 10 — a mere two weeks away. Designer Charles James revolutionized the post-war fashion world by updating romantic silhouettes into modern statements. Influenced by the Avant-Garde, he borrowed the biomorphic lines of Surrealism and the dramatic energy of Abstract Expressionism to engineer sculptural looks with artful appearances. “Charles James: Beyond Fashion” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art showcases 65 looks of this influential American couturier.

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