Philadelphia, without the perks.

How I missed my trip to Philadelphia, but was still able to appreciate the Art this city has to offer.

dany anc cy

I had made plans for a quick weekend trip to the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Barnes Foundation a couple weeks ago. The night I was supposed to leave, my body gave in on me and I sprained my ankle just walking, outside of a bar no less but really just trying to exit the bar in a reasonable manor at a decent hour of the night.

Instead of lamenting my missed plans, my mind instead decided to remember and relive my past vacations to this city. The Philadelphia Museum of Art is a total museum with an expansive collection. My favorite parts of its collection is their extensive collections of Marcel Duchamp, and wonderful annex filled to the brim with Cy Twombly. Pictures dish millions of words:

Marcel Duchamp "The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass)" (1915-23)

Marcel Duchamp “The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass)” (1915-23)

The Large Glass is remarkable, and any lover of art let along Marcel Duchamp will find its presentation fascinating and intriguing. You can sit on a bench and behold its presence as light shines through a nearby window, illuminating the intricate characters and designs to come to life.

Cy Twombly "The Fire that Consumes All Before It", part of "Fifty Days at Iliam" (1977)

Cy Twombly “The Fire that Consumes All Before It”, part of “Fifty Days at Iliam” (1977)

Cy Twombly "Shades of Eternal Night" part of "Fifty Days at Iliam" (1977)

Cy Twombly “Shades of Eternal Night” part of “Fifty Days at Iliam” (1977)

Cy Twombly "Shades of Achilles, Patroclus, and Hector", part of "Fifty Days at Iliam" (1977)

Cy Twombly “Shades of Achilles, Patroclus, and Hector”, part of “Fifty Days at Iliam” (1977)

Cy Twombly has a permanent exhibition of his gigantic 10 part series title “Fifty Days at Illiam” through which he spent two years reinterpreting in his fantastical style Homer’s epic poem the “Illiad”. So many crayons were used in the production of these canvases. His use of negative space remarkably illuminates bulbous and billowing forms that seemingly float for viewers entertainment. Its a spectacle in itself, and a fanciful interpretation of an age-old text.

Some Bruce Nauman for FUN

Some Bruce Nauman for FUN

And let us not forget Philadelphia’s fulfilling history:

lisa liberty bell

THE Liberty Bell

My trip may have been a mental trip, but it only sparked my interest to get back to Philadelphia and see some of the art it has to offer.

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